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How does a landlord effectively deal with Anti Social Behaviour?

However if you choose not to tenant reference you run the risk of housing a bad tenant which could cost you £000’s in terms of rent arrears, court costs and property damage.

As a professional and responsible landlord it is important to ensure you set the behaviour expectation with your tenants at the commencement of their tenancy agreement.

Before you enter into a tenancy agreement with a new tenant it is imperative you seek both a personal and work reference together with using the services of a tenant screening company. It will cost you money to ensure peace of mind in terms of tenant suitability. However if you choose not to tenant reference you run the risk of housing a bad tenant which could cost you £000’s in terms of rent arrears, court costs and property damage.

This is very important if you are a landlord with licensable HMOs as you will need to ensure appropriate clauses are contained within the tenancy agreement to prevent or reduce instances of anti-social behaviour (ASB) within the curtilage of their properties.

In order to ensure you are taking adequate steps to ensure improved community cohesion and harmony around your property all landlords should consider (as a minimum) the following:

·         provision of an emergency 24hr landlord contact number to tenants and immediate neighbours (including out of hours response arrangements-tenants only);

·         provision of the procedure the landlord will adopt to effectively deals with complaints about the occupants / visitors behaviour;

·         provision of arrangements for the disposal of rubbish and bulky waste.

 In situations where tenants are legitimately creating ASB issues and making no attempt to rectify their behaviour, the landlord should write a formal warning letter referring the tenants to the appropriate clauses in the tenancy agreement. This letter should also include the procedure the landlord will follow to terminate the tenancy if tenant behaviour does not improve.  

 Government’s advice is as follows:

In relation to ASB reduction and the authority a landlord has to tackle such activity within their properties, it should be pointed out that landlords and agents can only enforce a contract. They cannot manage behaviour (ref: House of Commons briefing note SN/SP 264, paragraph 1.1). In most circumstances, the only remedy available to landlords confronted with cases of serious ASB in one of their properties will be to seek vacant possession, and in many instances they will need to serve a Section 21 notice rather than a Section 8 notice identifying the grounds for possession. The former is simpler and cheaper and repossession (at present) is more certain.